Amphibians

Two toads and twelve frogs are known to inhabit the Pinelands. All of these amphibians are dependent on high-quality aquatic habitat for breeding, but some of them are otherwise more closely associated with uplands.

The Pine Barrens is the global stronghold for the Pine Barrens Treefrog, which uses mostly intermittent ponds in characteristic Pine Barrens areas for breeding. Residential development and farming in the Pinelands often result in changes to the chemistry of breeding habitats of these animals, and an influx of non-native species that can displace them. Carpenter Frogs are another characteristic Pine Barrens species, the presence of which indicates a healthy aquatic wildlife community. Some of the other more visible and well-known frog species of the Pine Barrens are the Green Frog and the Southern Leopard Frog.

Carpenter Frog

Rana virgatipes

Learn More

Eastern Spadefoot Toad

Scapphiopus holbrooki

Learn More

Eastern Tiger Salamander

Ambystoma tigrinum

Learn More

Four-toed Salamander

Hemidactylium scutatum

Learn More

Fowler's Toad

Bufo woodhousei fowleri

Learn More

Green Frog

Rana clamitans melanota

Learn More

Marbled Salamander

Ambystoma opacum

Learn More

Northern Dusky Salamander

Desmognathus fuscus

Learn More

Northern Red Salamander

Pseudotriton ruber

Learn More

Northern Spring Peeper

Hyla crucifer

Learn More

Northern Two-lined Salamander

Eurycea bislineata

Learn More

Pine Barrens Tree Frog

Hyla andersoni

Learn More

Red-backed Salamander

Plethodon cinereus

Learn More

Red-spotted Newt

Notophthalmus viridescens

Learn More

Southern Leopard Frog

Rana utricularia

Learn More

Spotted Salamander

Ambystoma maculatum

Learn More

Descriptions in this section are from A Field Guide to the Pine Barrens of New Jersey, courtesy Plexus Publishing

Bookmark and Share Find Related Info: wildlife, amphibians, Pine Barrens Tree Frog