Reptiles

About 20 species of snakes inhabit the Pinelands, and several of these populations are quite remarkable.

For example, the Timber Rattlesnake is the only venomous species in the Pinelands and exists here as a disjunct population. Having been extirpated from the immediate environs of the Pinelands, they have managed to survive in about seven reproducing populations scattered through the region. The closest neighboring populations are in far north Jersey. The Northern Pine Snake populations of the Pinelands are also cut off from their own kind. Northern Pine Snakes are not found again until you get all the way down to Virginia and West Virginia. Similarly, the Pinelands hosts the northernmost population of the Corn Snake. The most common snake of the Pinelands may be the Northern Water Snake. Surely the most bizarre snake of the area is the Eastern Hognose, also known as the Puff Adder, since it often spreads its neck, cobra-like, when alarmed.

Black Rat Snake

Elaphe obsoleta

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Common Snapping Turtle

Chelydra serpentina

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Eastern Box Turtle

Terrapene carolina

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Eastern Hognose Snake

Heterodon platyrhinos

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Eastern King Snake

Lampropeltis getulus

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Eastern Mud Turtle

Kinosternon subrubrum

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Eastern Painted Turtle

Chrysemys picta

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Eastern Ribbon Snake

Thamnophis sauritus

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Musk Turtle

Sternotherus odoratus

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Northern Black Racer

Coluber constrictor

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Northern Fence Lizard

Sceloporus undulatus hyacinthinus

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Northern Pine Snake

Pituophis melanoleucus

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Northern Water Snake

Natrix sipedon

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Red-bellied Turtle

Chrysemys rubriventris

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Corn Snake

Elaphe guttata

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Rough Green Snake

Opheodrys aesrivus

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Spotted Turtle

Clemmys guttata

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Timber Rattlesnake

Crotalus horridus

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